Equal Opportunities, Common Development

Chart 1-3: World economic growth rate and unemployment rate, 2007 to 2013 (%)

Source: Unemployment figures from ILO Global Employment Trends 2013. GDP figures from IMF World Economic Outlook ,October 2012.

Chart 1-4: Correlation between economic growth and employment in different regions of the world

Source: Unemployment figures from ILOGlobal Employment Trends 2013. GDP figures from IMFWorld Economic Outlook, October 2012.

ic Outlook, October 2012.

ween economic growth and employment in different regions of the world

Source: Unemployment figures from ILOGlobal Employment Trends 2013. GDP figures from IMFWorld Economic Outlook, October 2012.

 1.2.2 Entrenched unemployment

The unemployed population is on the rise once again. According to ILO statistics, it reached 197 million in 2012, an increase of 4.2 million over 2011 and 28.4 million more than the pre-crisis year of 2007, reaching its second highest point since the economic crisis. Moreover, with the economic slowdown, the employment situation is set to deteriorate further. In 2013,the number of unemployed workers may well exceed 200 million. If it continues to rise over the next five years, it may reach 210 million in 2017. Worldwide, with the exception of non-EUCSEE countries and those in southeast Asia and the Pacific region, the unemployed population in all regions is expected to keep expanding (see chart 1-5).

Chart 1-5: Global unemployed population, 2007 to 2017 (millions)

Source: ILO Global Employment Trends 2013. Figures from 2012 onward are forecasts.

The historically high unemployment rate remains the most severe challenge for all governments. According to ILO reports, the global unemployment rate was 5.9% in 2012, almost the same as in the previous year and 0.5 percentage points higher than in the pre-crisis year of 2007. It is expected to rise to 6.0% in 2013 and remain at the same high level for the following five years. By region, in 2013 the unemployment rate is expected to be 8.7% in developed economies and the EU, 4.5% in East Asia, 4.5% in Southeast Asia and the Pacific region, 3.9% in South Asia and 6.7%in Latin America and the Caribbean region. Overall, the unemployment rate across these regions is expected to increase by 0.1 percentage points compared with 2012. The rates in North Africa and sub-Saharan Africa are expected to be 10.3% and 7.5% respectively, around the same level as in 2012. In the Middle East the rate is expected to be as high as 11.1%.[4]The latest EU figures show that the unemployment rate in the Eurozone in April 2013 was as high as 12.2%, a record since such figures began to be collected in 1995, and among the highest worldwide (Italy scored a 12.8% rate, the highest for 36 years, while Greece saw 27.0%, Spain 26.8% and Portugal 17.8%).[5] Taken as a whole, with the exception of Southeast Asia and the Pacific, CSEE (non-EU) countries and the CIS region, where unemployment rates in 2012 and the succeeding five years are set to decline, the world’s regions will experience little or no improvement in their employment situation(see chart 1-6).

1 Prev 4 5 6 7 8 9 Next Last of 57

  Source: ACFTU  2013-05-23

More on this Story

    Services

    Recommended Reading